Chief Wakara's Final Resting Place

Discussion of the ever elusive location we've come to know as Carre-Shinob ... is it fact or legend?

Chief Wakara's Final Resting Place

Post Number:#1  Postby sanpete » Sat Mar 01, 2014 4:31 pm

I hope I can do this with out a lot of spelling goofs. I have a question here and hear it is. When Chief Walker died in Medow, Utah they buried him there along with some horses along with 2 of his wiefes and 2 kids. Now later on they (the tribe) tock him to the cave of chiefs . Now did they everything that was buried with him or did they have more horses and wifes and kids?
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Re: Chief Wakara's Final Resting Place

Post Number:#2  Postby Whyte Eagle » Sat Mar 01, 2014 6:32 pm

That's a great question Sanpet ... Personally I've never come across anything that would indicate that they moved anything but Walkara, that doesn't mean that they didn't ... but I would think that the Cave of Chiefs (Carre-Shinob) would have only been used for the interring the remains of the Chiefs along with some smaller funerary items, like maybe history sticks or small personal belongings ...
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Re: Chief Wakara's Final Resting Place

Post Number:#3  Postby zelph » Sun Mar 02, 2014 6:27 pm

Interesting thought Sanpet and thought provoking in terms of what the character of the "chiefs" are entombed in the Carre-Shinob.

I read the history of Chief Walkara and found him to be of questionable character to say the least. Hard to understand how someone could order the killing of his family to accompany him in death.

Why do you think his body was removed from his grave to be placed in Carre-Chinob? Is the Carre-Chinob a resting place for the "bad indians" also known as the Lamanites?

A BRIEF HISTORY

The Headline: "Death of Indian Walker," Deseret News Feb. 8, 1855.

In a brief note to Brigham Young, reprinted in the newspaper, David Lewis of Fillmore noted the passing of Ute Indian Chief Walkara or Walker. The chief's last advice to his followers was not to kill "Mormonee" cattle or steal from pioneer settlers, Lewis reported.The chief did not live to see the lands he had ruled declared one of the United States. It would have been the final ignominy for a proud man who watched in frustration as white newcomers flooded into prime valleys, claimed rivers, competed for fish and game and drew lines that defined individual properties where Indians had roamed at will.

Walkara, variously called Wahkara, Wakara, Walker, Yaw-keraw or Cuaka, was one of many Indian leaders who interacted with Mormons and other whites as the American West was absorbed into the Union. But this one chief epitomizes to a large extent what happened as incompatible cultures clashed.

Judged in the context of his own culture, Walkara was a clever, fearless brave who boasted that "I have many scars, and they are all on my front." He looked after the welfare of his followers in ingenious ways while he tried to hold onto a disappearing lifestyle.

Weighed on the scales of white society, he was a thief, a vain opportunist, a cruel enemy and a merciless savage. One writer noted his capacity to switch from "wild-cat fierceness" to a "velvet-pawed" demeanor at will.

Walkara had another name - Pannacarra-Quinker (Iron Twister) - that he assumed after a "vision" he had as a young man that appeared to be a premonition of things to come. In his account of the vision, he said his spirit left his body for a day and a night. He stood in the presence of a god-figure, Shinob, and many angels. Shinob told him he must go back to earth to complete his work and that white friends would come to live with him.

Born some time in the first quarter of the 19th century in the area that is now Utah Valley, he came from a large, polygamous family. His father was killed during a civil war, and Walkara and a brother, Arrapeen, were credited with avenging his death.

Some reported Walkara to be a tall, fine-looking man, a man of imposing appearance, "the very beau ideal of nature's nobility." To others, he was an "ugly-looking specimen for an Indian chief."

The horse came to Utah not long before Walkara did, and the animal became his source of wealth and reputation. A legend says that his father was the first in their tribe to acquire a horse. He tied it to his wickiup and let it starve to death, the story goes.

Horses became Walkara's medium of exchange, and as a young man he ranged throughout the Great Basin, south to what was then Mexico, and west to the Pacific Coast to round up other men's horses and bring them back to central Utah, where he was chief of the Sanpitch group.

By 1840, people in San Bernardino, Calif., complained that "the moon has come again and with it the dread Py-Utahs." The cagey Indian leader learned that he was most likely to get caught on the El Cajon Pass. So he would send his men with small groups of animals into canyons, skirt the pass and meet again at the Mojave River.

One such raid took him to every ranch "south of Santa Ana to the San Juan," a California historian wrote. The raid netted more than 3,000 animals.

On another foray into Mexico, Walkara headed for the Colorado River with a number of stolen animals, the owners in hot pursuit. When the animals refused to go into the river, the Indian chief salvaged the situation by taking some of the horses right back to the owners. Banking that they couldn't identify him as one of the thieves, he told them he had nobly fought with the raiders and lost three men trying to retrieve their horses. He should, he said, have some compensation for saving their property. The owners bought back their own animals.

Capturing and holding Spaniards for ransom provided another source of sustenance for Walkara and his warriors.

Western explorer John C. Fremont on May 20, 1844, described Walkara and his raiders as "robbers of a higher order than those of the great Californian caravans. They conduct their depradations with form and under the color of trade and toll for passing through their country." The Indians made token payment for many of the items they intended to take anyway, he said.

Another early Utah explorer, Thomas L. Kane, said in an 1850 lecture that Walkara dressed "in a full suit of the richest broadcloth, generally brown and cut in European fashion, with a shining beaver hat and fine cambric shirt. To these he adds his own gaudy Indian trimmings. . . . He rides at the head of his troop whose richly cap-arisoned horses, with their embroidered saddles and harness, shine and tinkle as they prance under the weight of gay metal ornaments."

Walkara also was involved in the slave trade that thrived in the Great Basin. In hard times, some of the poorer tribes readily sold women and children in exchange for horses, which they ate.

Other children were acquired through war or raids on their camps. They were sold to Mexican traders, who in turn, offered them as slaves in California or Mexico. The average price for a boy was $100, while girls brought $150 to $200, said Daniel W. Jones, who spent 40 years among the Indians.

Walkara had associations with some of the mountain men who predated the Mormons. On one occasion, he was hunting buffalo with Peg Leg Smith and Jim Bridger when a band of Shoshones showed up in the same area. Walkara called on the two white men to join him in attacking these traditional enemies of the Utes. Peg Leg said he couldn't because he didn't have a horse, so Walkara gave him one - a mount that insisted on being right in the thick of the battle.

Peg Leg grabbed a war club from a Shoshone and fought for his life. At the end of the fray, Walkara offered him as many of his squaws as he wanted. "Being a very modest man, I only took three," Peg Leg reportedly said of that event.

The occasional mountain man was one thing. When hundreds and then thousands of Mormon pioneers began to pour into the area, with every appearance of settling in for the duration, that was something else.

Mormon leaders were fortunate in selecting the safest possible place for their first settlement. Salt Lake Valley lay in a no-man's land between Ute and Shoshone territories.

News that whites had settled in the valley reached Walkara in Spanish Fork Canyon. His first reaction was a resolve to drive the intruders out. He fought with a half-brother, Sowiette, who preferred peaceful co-existence. Sowiette prevailed, after whipping Walkara with a rawhide whip. Throughout their lives, Sowiette and Walkara had several clashes, always over the same issue.

From then until his death, Walkara vacillated between "using" the Mormon immigrants and threatening them when he couldn't get his way.

In June of 1848, after waiting in vain for Brigham Young to come to him, Walkara went to see the leader of the whites. He invited Young to send settlers to his home grounds in what became Sanpete County.

On March 13, 1850, Manti Bishop Isaac Morley baptized Walkara. Membership in the LDS Church, however, did not change Walkara's basic nature. He traded on the membership when it was convenient. His ties to the church, he concluded, entitled him to two things - priesthood "medicine" and a white wife. Several years passed before Walkara and three other Indians were ordained elders in the church priesthood organization.

He was not so successful in obtaining a white wife. At one juncture, he decided that Bishop Lowry's daughter, Mary, was a good choice. He dressed to the nines and went to the Lowry home when he thought Mary would be alone and placed a blanket, some moccasins, a beaded headband and other items on the table, followed by a crude proposal. He offered her furs and cowhides with hoofs and long horns - even a "white man's teepee."

Terrified of antagonizing the chief, Mary blurted that she was promised to another man. The name that came to mind was her brother-in-law, "Judge Peacock," who had married her twin sister. Walkara, according to several accounts, plunged his knife hilt-deep into a table and said he would take the matter to Brigham Young.

Young, in fact, promised Walkara that if Mary "is not already married, you may have her." Young knew what the chief did not - that Mary and her brother-in-law had rushed to Nephi immediately and wed. With polygamy in full sway, it was a logical solution to the problem.

As more whites filled the mountain valleys, building walls that were intended specifically to keep the likes of Walkara out, the chief became increasingly frustrated.

"We cannot shake hands across walls," he complained.

In the summer of 1853 in Payson, an Indian was killed by a white, who was trying to defend the Indian's wife.

The Walker War was on. The chief's men simultaneously attacked four settlements, Spring-ville, Pleasant Creek, Manti and Nephi. But the Mormons were prepared. A militia sped through the settlements warning of the Indian attacks, and the Indians' only victims were people who were away from their forts for some reason.

In all, 10 whites were killed and an unknown number of Indians. Walkara, confused and increasingly stymied in his attempts to arrive at some common ground with the enemy, went to spend the winter with the Navajos in New Mexico.

The following spring the chief and Young were to meet for peace talks. The meeting was awkward, and Walkara refused to talk the first night. He said he wanted to speak with the Great Spirit before speaking with Young.

The following day, he confessed that he had no more heart for war with the whites. The peace pipe was passed, and it was agreed Walkara would be awarded 40 acres of land - small compensation for a man who had ruled over thousands of square miles. He accompanied Young on the rest of the church leader's tour of southern settlements.

Again spending much of the winter south of the Colorado, Walkara returned to Utah a sick man. In late January, he was camped on Meadow Creek when he received Young's assurance of continuing friendship, along with a promise of two beeves. Walkara invited the messenger, David Lewis, to return the following day, but during the night of Jan. 29, 1855, Walkara died.

According to Ute custom, his people wailed their loss, accenting their cries with the rhythmic rattle of gravel-filled gourds. The circle gathered around the chief's body, swayed back and forth while a warrior occasionally rose to repeat one of the chief's exploits or deeds.

His body securely bound upright on his horse, Walkara made his last ride to the head of a canyon, where his body was laid on blankets in a rocky excavation.

His weapons and ammunition were placed beside him. All of his personal horses and two squaws were killed to keep him company on his journey. In his hand as the pit disappeared under a covering of pickets and stone was his last letter from Brigham Young.

A live Paiute boy and girl were put in a cairn on top of the burial pit. Their assignment was to watch over Walkara until they, too, died.

The panicked boy worked his head through the pickets, and some cattlemen working nearby heard his cries for water and moved to interfere. Warning bullets from Indian guns put them on notice to leave Walkara's burial to long custom
. His passing spared him the fate of other Indians who, over time, were assigned to reservations.

Read more at http://www.deseretnews.com/article/4056 ... yE5uMus.99

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Re: Chief Wakara's Final Resting Place

Post Number:#4  Postby zelph » Mon Mar 03, 2014 11:35 am

Quoted from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walkara#CITEREFBailey1954

The Walker War ended through an understanding personally negotiated between Young and Walkara during the winter of 1853 and finalized in May 1854 in Levan, near Nephi, Utah. In his contemporary work Incidents of Travel and Adventure in the Far West (1857), photographer and artist Solomon N. Carvalho gives an account of the peace council held between Walkara, other native leaders in central Utah, and Brigham Young. Carvalho took the opportunity to persuade the Indian leader to pose for a portrait, now held by the Thomas Gilcrease Institute, Tulsa, Oklahoma. Although immediate hostilities ended, none of the underlying conflicts were resolved. Walkara died in 1855 at Meadow Creek, Utah.

At his funeral, fifteen horses, two wives, and two children were killed and buried along with him.[5]
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Re: Chief Wakara's Final Resting Place

Post Number:#5  Postby sanpete » Mon Mar 03, 2014 4:11 pm

zelph you said "prime valleys" let me tell you that the Sanpete Valley is anything but prime.
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Re: Chief Wakara's Final Resting Place

Post Number:#6  Postby zelph » Tue Mar 04, 2014 9:30 pm

sanpet wrote:zelph you said "prime valleys" let me tell you that the Sanpete Valley is anything but prime.


I've been known to make mistakes :")
Are you still farming your land or leasing it out?

Where did you read about Walkera be dug up and transferred to another place?

In the history that I quoted it said "According to Ute custom,"..Is the word Ute a short version of Paiute? The word Paiute was used in a sentence that said:

A live Paiute boy and girl were put in a cairn on top of the burial pit. Their assignment was to watch over Walkara until they, too, died.

You better be careful out where you live. These treasure hunters on this site talk about Utes shooting at them. :lol: I laugh because the one cowboy with the six shooter shot all his rounds off at the ghost of the Rhodes mines :lol: ..I think his name Scipio...quite the character he is!!!! He seems to be on a roundup of fellow hunters to get a group gathering to settle the myths once and for all :mrgreen:
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Re: Chief Wakara's Final Resting Place

Post Number:#7  Postby Randy Bradford » Mon Mar 10, 2014 12:02 pm

zelph wrote:Interesting thought Sanpet and thought provoking in terms of what the character of the "chiefs" are entombed in the Carre-Shinob.

I read the history of Chief Walkara and found him to be of questionable character to say the least. Hard to understand how someone could order the killing of his family to accompany him in death.

Why do you think his body was removed from his grave to be placed in Carre-Chinob? Is the Carre-Chinob a resting place for the "bad indians" also known as the Lamanites?


You've made at least three errors here.

1.) You're judging a different culture through the lens of your own. It's an unfair comparison that overlooks the fact that a funeral rite is not a reflection of character, necessarily. Culture dictates norms, customs, acceptable behavior and expectations.

2.) You're judging a man from a modern perspective with no thought to how the context of a behavior was considered in it's proper time period. Granted, it's clear from the reading that the Mormons at the time found the behavior reprehensible, but I'd refer back to my first point on cultural context.

3.) You've accepted whatever history you read at face value. Fact is, all sides of a story always have a bias and the only way to gain some glimmer of reality (and trust me, it will rarely be more than a glimmer) is to know them both and accept that the "truth" is somewhere in the middle. Minimally, we don't have an account by Walker himself, much less by his own people. If we did, we still wouldn't have a full picture, simply more data to ponder.

When it comes to history, complete truth will always be like dumping a glass of water into a river and trying to get it back in the glass.

If you want to go strictly Mormon, the Lamanites were only "bad" initially. The dichotomy of Nephites/Lamanites quickly becomes far more complicated as groups found the gospel, accepted it, were prosperous, and fell to pride and disbelief. Nepites and Lamanites switched back and forth repeatedly until both distinctions were just a label to represent good and evil and not a true reflection of the people that embraced the genetics. This also fails to consider how interbreeding as a result of the repeated taking and losing of lands would have resulted. To say nothing of the fact that there is no reason to beleive the Nephites and Lamanites were ever the exclusive populace and not simply two groups being written about among many others that were not.
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Re: Chief Wakara's Final Resting Place

Post Number:#8  Postby Toghoyok » Mon Mar 10, 2014 8:50 pm

Man Randy, when you hit the nail on the head,
you really Doooo hit the nail on the head!
:""
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Re: Chief Wakara's Final Resting Place

Post Number:#9  Postby zelph » Tue Mar 11, 2014 9:13 am

On March 13, 1850, Manti Bishop Isaac Morley baptized Walkara.

during the night of Jan. 29, 1855, Walkara died.


Walkera had five years to learn of the 10 Commandments. One of which is "Thou Shalt Not Kill"

As the leader of his group he allowed the killing/sacrificing of innocent women and children.

All of his personal horses and two squaws were killed to keep him company on his journey.


A live Paiute boy and girl were put in a cairn on top of the burial pit. Their assignment was to watch over Walkara until they, too, died.

My statement was PG13 When I said:

(I read the history of Chief Walkara and found him to be of questionable character to say the least. Hard to understand how someone could order the killing of his family to accompany him in death.)

Randy, I meant no harm to anyone by stating my opinion/feelings. I don't think I was unreasonable or offensive.

Sanpet asked a question wanting to know if the remains of his familly members were also taken to the cave. His question sparked and interest in Walkara's history, so I googled and the rest is history.

Randy, I have read the 3 errors that I have made. I appreciate your input and concern.

Sanpet's question still goes unanswered.

I still want to know the source of the information regarding the removal of Walkara from his stone grave.
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Re: Chief Wakara's Final Resting Place

Post Number:#10  Postby Randy Bradford » Tue Mar 11, 2014 11:58 am

Zelph, I apologize if my commentary seemed harsh, that was not the point. Perhaps too much of my "social worker" side is coming out. A big part of my understanding of history comes from my study of it and being introspective about that assessments I make of the things I read. I always ask myself where things come from inside of me...why do I think something, what influences my perspective. It's the best way to reduce bias that can never be fully eliminated but can certainly be held at bay. Projecting your values onto people who may not share them is never good policy. Projecting those values onto a historical situation where we will never have a full picture, and more often than not have little more than the frame and have to imagine the picture, is simply not real useful.

I have to confess, a big part of my philosophy is bred from my innate desire to not look foolish any more than possible. When taking a stand on historical matters it's far too easy to do I'm afraid.
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Re: Chief Wakara's Final Resting Place

Post Number:#11  Postby zelph » Tue Mar 11, 2014 2:01 pm

Whyte Eagle wrote:That's a great question Sanpet ... Personally I've never come across anything that would indicate that they moved anything but Walkara, that doesn't mean that they didn't ... but I would think that the Cave of Chiefs (Carre-Shinob)would have only been used for the interring the remains of the Chiefs along with some smaller funerary items, like maybe history sticks or small personal belongings ...


Whyte Eagle feast your eyes upon what I have found.

I can't remember who or what infused in my mind that the cave of chiefs would be sacred.

Well I think all my questions have been answered in the last half hour. ;=)
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Re: Chief Wakara's Final Resting Place

Post Number:#12  Postby Whyte Eagle » Tue Mar 11, 2014 2:09 pm

I don't recall exactly, but if memory serves me right the term "Cave of Chiefs" was a quote from the news article. I included "Carre-Shinob" in parenthesis to indicate that maybe it was one and the same place. I don't know that the care takers of the location called it Sacred, or referred to it as such, but I have found references to two distinct names, 1) The Cave of Death and 2) The place were God dwells ... I suppose you could insinuate that the latter of the two would be synonymous with Sacred, but it would depend on who was doing the definitions. My interpitation and reasoning for the two names comes from what I believe was stored there for about 300 years between the mid 1550's to the md 1850's ...
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Re: Chief Wakara's Final Resting Place

Post Number:#13  Postby sanpete » Tue Mar 11, 2014 2:27 pm

sanpet wrote:I hope I can do this with out a lot of spelling goofs. I have a question here and hear it is. When Chief Walker died in Medow, Utah they buried him there along with some horses along with 2 of his wiefes and 2 kids. Now later on they (the tribe) tock him to the cave of chiefs . Now did they everything that was buried with him or did they have more horses and wifes and kids?

I think that I'm the one who came up with "The Cave of Chiefs". Used that name as a place where there must be more chiefs than one to be buried there. Now this brings up another question Could there be more than one chief buried there?
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Re: Chief Wakara's Final Resting Place

Post Number:#14  Postby Whyte Eagle » Tue Mar 11, 2014 5:13 pm

Sanpet wrote:Could there be more than one chief buried there?


I think there is more than one interred there ... if you're talking about Carre-Shinob ...
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Re: Chief Wakara's Final Resting Place

Post Number:#15  Postby Randy Bradford » Tue Mar 11, 2014 5:17 pm

Do we have any references to such a cave...or even Walker's body being moved...by a source other than Boren?
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Re: Chief Wakara's Final Resting Place

Post Number:#16  Postby sanpete » Wed Mar 12, 2014 12:29 pm

Birth: 1800
Spanish Fork
Utah County
Utah, USA
Death: Dec. 29, 1855
Meadow
Millard County
Utah, USA

Native Americans of this era were given, or earned, birth names; therefore, surnames were not commonly used.

Chief Walkara, aka Yah-keera, aka Walker, aka Colorow Ignacia Ouray, aka In-carree-keera, aka Wacca, aka Wakeera was born about 1800. Walkara is considered the correct spelling; as American Indian names were spelled phonetically, there are many variations.

The Shoshoni name, Walkara, means "Hawk". He was one of, at least, eight sons of a chief of the Timpanogo Ute Indian Band, named Moonch. They were known as warriors of the Great Basin Tribe, raised in the region along what is now known as the Spanish Fork River in Utah. Nicknamed "Hawk of the Mountains" and "Napoleon of the Deseret", he became one of the West's leading War Chiefs.

His birth name was Pan-a-Carre Quinker (Iron Twister), but he maintained that, in a vision he received on "Medicine Rock", after the tragic death of his first love and her unborn child, he was renamed.....by "Towats", the Great Spirit. He was to be called Ya-Keerah, "Keeper of the Yellow Metal". This was in reference of his inherited guardianship of the Ute Nation's gold, contained in the High Uinta Mountains of Utah.

In the 1820's he and other Ute leaders established trade relations with intruding fur trappers from Europe, Canada and the east coast of America. They formed alliances with the foremost mountain men traveling the Old Spanish Trail from New Mexico to California. The chiefs were successful in demanding "tribute" or bounty from others crossing Ute land.

He and his brothers, including the famed Chief Arapeen, for whom the Arapeen Valley near Sterling, Utah was named, gathered warriors from various tribes, including Paiutes, Utes, Shoshone and others, forming raiding parties which brought them great wealth. Chief San-Pitch, Chief Kanosh, and Sowiette were legendary brothers of Walkara, as was Tabiona, Ammon, and Grospeen. By the early 1840's Walkara was reputedly the principle ruling chief of this region. In addition to mastering the alphabet of Indian Sign Language, he was known to be fluent in many native dialects and could speak both Spanish and English, which gave him great influence as a cunning trader. Native bands paid bounty to him in return for his protection and influence with other tribes.

His friends and brothers knew him as a highly principled man who provided well for his family. He created a well organized cavalry, which was successful in raiding and capturing large numbers of horses, the most famous being a campaign in 1840 through the Cajon Pass into southern California. It is said that they acquired up to 3000 head of horses, mainly stolen from Spaniards, including Cahuilla leader, Juan Antonio.

The entire Great Basin was his stomping ground and his people took pride in his reputation as both a savvy diplomat and a great horse thief. The Cajon Pass, in California, has two canyons named for his prosperous exploits - Horse Thief Canyon and Little Horse Thief Canyon!

Chief Walkara was recognized by his use of bright yellow buckskin leathers and yellow face paint, which he used during these raids, and was sometimes called "Man of Gold" and "Keeper of Yellow Metal". His followers were often bedecked with metal ornaments and brightly dyed materials.

Walkara was initially friendly to the Latter-day Saint pioneers who, in 1848, began to settle in the Great Salt Lake Valley. He admired their presiding leader, Brigham Young, and invited the "Mormon" colonists to settle the "San-Pitch Valley" near present day Manti, Utah. It would later be known as Sanpete Valley.

It is legend that the original gold adorning the statue of Moroni and other architecture of the Salt Lake City LDS Temple was donated by Chief Walkara, as a sign of his admiration for the Mormon Prophet. Walkara was reported to have been the first "Lamanite" to have been baptized a Christian in the valley. On March 13, 1850, Manti Bishop Isaac Morley baptized Walkara a member of the LDS Church.

Trade relations were mutual between Walkara and President Young. Soon, his lifestyle of raiding was threatened by expanding settlement and pressure from federal troops, originally sent west to keep an eye on the Mormons because of their religious practices. Walkara had also enjoyed a profitable slave trade in his raids on lesser tribes and this did not set well with the Mormons, who held beliefs based on each individual's right to freedom.

Tension erupted into what is known as The Walker War. In July of 1853 settlers in the area of Springfield, Utah Valley and several Shoshone band members committed mutual hostilities and confrontations resulted in several deaths. By May of 1854, The Walker War ended through negotiations between Brigham Young and Chief Walkara.

In his contemporary work, "Incidents of Travel and Adventure in the Far West" (1857), photographer and artist Solomon N. Carvalho gives account of the council held between Walkara, other native leaders, and President Young. Carvalho persuaded Chief Walkara to pose for a portrait, now held by the Thomas Gilcrease Institute, Tulsa, Oklahoma.

Walkara died of peneumonia 29 January 1855 at Meadow Creek, Millard County, Utah. Purportedly, at his funeral, fifteen horses, two favorite wives, and two if his children were killed and buried along with him. In addition, two living Piede slave children were sealed inside the tomb to keep "watch" over him and his treasures. Their crying was to scare away animals and possible enemies until the spirits of the departed had three days to make their journey to "Towats". These were savage customs, which repulsed civilized inhabitants, causing a rift between local settlers and Walkara's brothers.

According to the "Utah State Burials Data Base, Markers and Monuments": Chief Walkara was born on the banks of the Pequinarynoquint (Stinking) River in Utah County. He was "buried in a sepulcher of stone on the rugged eastern cliff side above the community of Meadow". His grave was located up Dry Canyon, the first canyon north of Corn Creek. It is presumed the grave was robbed in 1909.

A monument, with a picture of him and an engraved metal plaque upon a 5' X 5' Lava Rock Boulder, was placed in 1973 at 335 North Main Street in Meadow, Millard, Utah. Another Utah State Monument at 50 West Capitol Avenue in Fillmore, Millard, Utah is a large roofed kiosk with pictures, maps and photographs, known as "The Land of the Yuta Markers". It features a plaque dedicated to Chief Walkara, describing his burial in the talus slope overlooking the western desert above Meadow.

It was reported that the original gravesite was robbed in 1909, but pioneers claimed that, in April of 1856, his frozen remains were secreted off and buried by his brother, Chief Arapeen, who had succeeded Walkara as reigning chief of the Utes and his half brother, Tabiona (Chief Tabby), along with five other Utes and two Mormon Elders.

The secret site was said to be high in the Uinta Mountains, at a location known as Carre-Shinob. Here Walkara's remains were supposedly placed to repose with those of his paternal grandfather and many ancestors. Legend has it that the site is also a repository of much Uinta gold from Indian mines.


Family links:
Spouse:
Sasquina Walkara (1822 - 1838)

Children:
Battee Walkara (1837 - 1850)*

*Calculated relationship


Burial:
Non-Cemetery Burial
Specifically: Secret Cave Entombment

Created by: history4sure
Record added: Apr 18, 2010
Find A Grave Memorial# 51293941






Pan-a-Carre Quinker Chief Walkara Walkara
Added by: history4sure

Pan-a-Carre Quinker Chief Walkara Walkara
Added by: history4sure

Pan-a-Carre Quinker Chief Walkara Walkara
Added by: history4sure


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Only ONE knows your story - HE who rules in Heaven.
- history4sure
Added: Jun. 7, 2013
Hawk of the Mountains. History is a matter of opinion. Our Creator will judge us all. Blessings to your people.
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Added: Apr. 18, 2010
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Re: Chief Wakara's Final Resting Place

Post Number:#17  Postby Randy Bradford » Wed Mar 12, 2014 12:54 pm

This sounds like material gathered from the treasure books for the biography, not the other way around. The use of "Carre Shin-Ob" only seems to validate that position.
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Re: Chief Wakara's Final Resting Place

Post Number:#18  Postby sanpete » Wed Mar 12, 2014 4:53 pm

Randy that is just one of the many things that comes up when you google Chief Walker. I believe that just today I have seen about 5 different birth days on him. I believe that he is one of the most important chief's in western history. I also believe only half of what I read about him.
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Re: Chief Wakara's Final Resting Place

Post Number:#19  Postby zelph » Wed Mar 12, 2014 8:25 pm

Sanpet, nice find....


The secret site was said to behigh in the Uinta Mountains, at a location known as Carre-Shinob. Here Walkara's remains were supposedly placed to repose with those of his paternal grandfather and many ancestors.


I don't know why but I always thought caves were near ground level. Whyte Eagle believes the Carre is a cave. Are there caves at high elevations?
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Re: Chief Wakara's Final Resting Place

Post Number:#20  Postby Toghoyok » Wed Mar 12, 2014 8:53 pm

Timpanogos cave in Utah is about 1000 feet up on the side of American Fork canyon
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Re: Chief Wakara's Final Resting Place

Post Number:#21  Postby zelph » Wed Mar 12, 2014 9:10 pm

Toghoyok , thank you :D

I learn something new every day. :~d
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Re: Chief Wakara's Final Resting Place

Post Number:#22  Postby zelph » Tue Mar 18, 2014 9:37 am

Hey Sanpet I came across this today. don't think I've read this version in the forums. Lot more details:

Land of the Yuta (3) Markers
Plaque A: DEATH OF A CHIEF The winter of 1854-55 found Walkara and his band camped along Meadow Creek just four miles south of this spot. In January, the chief began to feel ill, and by the later part of the month he was suffering from pneumonia. On January 29, the Hawk of the Mountains died. Carrying out the wishes of his dead brother, Arapene slashed the throats of Walkara's two wives so that their spirits might walk with that of the Hawk. On the day of their deaths, the bodies of the Chief and his wives were securely strapped to horses and carried to the mountain above what is now the town of Meadow. There, in the talus slopes which overlook the western deserts of the Great Basin, Walkara was interred in a tomb of stone. The Chief was placed on his favorite blue blanket, and the still-bloody bodies of his two wives were laid on either side. A young Paiute girl was also killed and put into the grave while another Paiute child, a small boy, was staked alive in the pit to ward off wild animals. Before the tomb was sealed, an ornate saddle with brocaded cherubim, a Book of Mormon, rifles, bows, steel-tipped arrows, Spanish ornaments and food were placed with the dead chief. To seal the ten foot diameter tomb, logs were placed across the top of the grave. Rocks were then stacked on top of the logs to conceal the posts and the burial vault. With the sealing of the tomb, 14 of Walkara's favorite horses were led to the grave and killed. A Forest Service survey of the burial site in 1983 revealed scattered skeletal remains of these horses 128 years after they had been killed. This survey also confirmed what had been unofficially suspected for years: Walkara's grave had been robbed by relic hunters sometime around 1909. 200 yards north of Walkara's grave site are a number of Ute burials from the same general time period; that is, the 1850's and 1860's. These burials are not as grand as Walkara's. Generally they consist of a small vault in the talus just big enough for a single individual accompanied by a small number of grave goods. Of the 20 burials, 13 have been disturbed by grave robbers. Human bones have been scattered indisciminantely across talus slopes while graves have been looted of the goods that accompanied the dead at burial.
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Re: Chief Wakara's Final Resting Place

Post Number:#23  Postby zelph » Tue Mar 18, 2014 9:38 am

Plaque B: THE UTE DOMAIN First described by Spanish explorers as the YUTA Indians (pronounced Ute-ah), the ancestors of the Ute people are thought to have migrated from the deserts of southeastern California over 700 years ago. The Utes moved into predominately two areas and became somewhat distinct because of that geographical division. The eastern Utes (Colorado) migrated to the east of the Colorado River and settled on the Colorado Plateau. On the other hand the western Utes (Utah) established their camps in the valleys between the rugged mountain ranges on the eastern margin of the Great Basin. In south central Utah, one of the earliest camps has been dated to around A.D. 1380 and consists of stone circle 10 to 15 feet in diameter which would have anchored skin or brush shelters called wickiups. Unlike the Fremont and Anasazi Indians who preceded them, the ancestors of the Utes were not farmers but rather relied on hunting and gathering for their sustenance. When encountered by the Dominguez-Escalante Expedition in 1776 the Utes were found living in "homes of grass and earth" near the shores of Utah Lake. Father Escalante, the chronicler of the expedition, describes the Indians as having good features with most of the men wearing long breads. The Indians called themselves the Timpanogozis or the "fish eaters" but their diet also consisted of plants, herbs and wild game. Escalante wrote that the Utes were a docile and peace-loving people. Over a century later, an adventurer by the name of Dan Storm spent the winter of 1839-40 with the Utes in an encampment near Utah Lake. The village consisted of two dozen buffalo-hide tipis occupied by 100 men, women and children. The people kept about 300 horses which they had obtained from the Spanish beginning in the early 1800s. The Utah Lake Utes, according to Storm, were one of the strongest of the six independant bands that made up the western Utes. Storm found the Utes considerably more aggressive than had the Spanish, and he wrote of participating in a raid on the Goshute Indians of western Utah. Many prisoners were taken in this raid with women and children ultimately sold as slaves to the Navajos and the Mexicans
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Re: Chief Wakara's Final Resting Place

Post Number:#24  Postby zelph » Tue Mar 18, 2014 9:39 am

. With the arrival of the Mormon Pioneers in 1847, relations between the Utes and the newcomers were at first peaceable and friendly. George A. Smith, of the Utah Indian Service wrote, "They are virtuous, honest and free from licentiousness; they are humane and kind to one another." Smith described the Utes as typical mountain Indians. They were wanderers and had seasonal camps all over central and southern Utah including those near Spanish Fork, Payson, Nephi, Manti, Fish Lake, Meadow, Kanosh and Parowan. On occasion, the Utes ventured as far as the plains of Colorado in search of buffalo meat and hides. Marriage was polygamous, and a man might take as many wives as he could afford. Women were expected to raise their children, butcher and process wild game and plants, provide meals, and to move camp. The role of the men, in contrast, was that of hunter and warrior. The greatest warrior and chief during the early pioneer period was the tall, handsome man named Walkara, the "Hawk of the Mountains." Born somewhere between 1808 and 1815 on the Spanish Fork River near what is now Provo, Walkara rose to power when he assumed the role of war chief in his father's band, the Tim-pan-ah-gos Utes. The Hawk quickly increased his prominance as a leader by his skill and prowess as a "procurer" of horse flesh. Raiding as far away as the coast of California near San Luis Obispo, Walkara terrorized western ranches for over a quarter of a century until his death in 1855. According to fragmentary accounts, his raids were conducted between 1825 and 1854. The largest number of horses stolen on any one raid was 3,000 with several raids netting at least 1,000 head. Horses could be sold at a mountain rendez-vous for as much as $50 per animal or traded to other tribes for Indian children who were then exchanged for ammunition, blankets, pots and pans, and trinkets at the Santa Fe slave market. Inevitably the differences in culture, customs and economics brought the Utes and Mormon Pioneers into armed conflict.
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Re: Chief Wakara's Final Resting Place

Post Number:#25  Postby zelph » Tue Mar 18, 2014 9:39 am

The Utes found their hunting and camping grounds increasing crowded with settlements while the Christian values of the pioneers prevented them from ignoring the issue of slavery. In 1853-54 and again in 1865-67, smoldering hostilities were fanned into open warfare. In 1872, with their ranks desimated by both war and disease, 1,500 Utes were removed by treaty to the Uintah Indian Reservation in northeastern Utah. Today, headquarters for the Ute Tribe of Utah or the "Northern Ute Tribe" as it is now called, is located near the center of the reservation at Ft. Duchesne. Plaque C: WALKARA'S WAR When the Utes welcomed Brigham Young and his party of 143 pioneers in 1847, they offered the Mormons the use of the land but had not given them their streams with their fish and beaver. They had also not reckoned with the fact that the white man would fence the land into little squares and tell them to keep out and, they had not known that the ever increasing streams of newcomers would build forts as strong holds amoung them. In 1853, relations between the pioneers and the Utes were strained to the limits. In July of that year, three Indians from Chief Walkara's camp on Hobble Creek appeared at the cabin door of James Ivie near Springville to trade fish for flour. An argument followed, and Ivie killed one of the Indians in a hand-to-hand fight with a broken rifle stock. Walkara, upset with this incident and the Mormons recent policy opposing his lucrative slave trade, grasped the situation and unleashed a hit-and-run reign of terror that plagued the settlements in Utah, Juab, Sanpete, Millard and Iron Counties for the better part of the next year. Ironically, the largest "engagement" of the war was not fought by Walkara but by Pahvant Utes camped at Meadow Creek just at the mouth of Fillmore. In the fall of 1853, a wagon train of Missourians on route to California camped near the Indian village.
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